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Tyres  /  Tyre NewsEV Tyre News  / New Suzuki Swift

Swift evolution: Suzuki teases next generation of reliable runabout  

New Suzuki Swift Concept Car

The new fourth-generation Swift could be the antidote to spiraling supermini prices. Here’s everything we know following its Tokyo Motor Show debut.   

Behold, the new Suzuki Swift. Ok, so technically these images depict the Swift concept, but we have it on good authority that the production model will look all but identical.  

Is that a good thing, then? Well, scholars of automotive design will probably attest to the fact the Swift has never been a style icon, and this new variant is no different. That being said, for those who previously enjoyed its soft, cutesy features, it’s business as usual for the new version.  

Signature Swift-isms that have been carried over, include black C-Pillars which give the illusion of a floating roof at the rear, and a similar tail-light design to before. At the front, the old car’s angular mouth and steeply slanted headlights gave it an angry face, but to our eyes, the new model’s more rounded aesthetic makes it look like Swift is upset about something.  

Suzuki Swift Rear
From the rear, the new model is instantly recognisable as a Swift.
Image credit: Suzuki

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Stepping inside, there’s little to knock your socks off. But, the material quality and dashboard design are leaps and bounds ahead of what you might expect from a car at this end of the market. A surprising number of physical buttons also feature throughout — which get a thumbs up from us on account of being easier and more tactile to use whilst driving. And, you might have already spotted the automatic gear selector protruding from between the seats.  

To the horror of some, that gear lever won’t connect to a conventional torque converter automatic ‘box, but rather, a CVT unit. Worry not though, as Suzuki says that when combined with their 1.2-litre mild-hybrid endowed petrol engine, the powertrain “strikes a balance between driving performance and fuel efficiency”.  

On the subject of driving thrills, the Japanese manufacturer has made it clear that the new model is more than just an appliance designed to haul small families from point A to point B. When engineering the chassis, “drive and feel” were reportedly high on the agenda. And while little has been given in the way of specifics, we have no reason to doubt Suzuki given that previous warmed-up versions of the Swift were shockingly capable in the twisties.

Suzuki Swift Interior
With features like keyless go and collision avoidance, you get plenty for your money.
Image credit:  Suzuki

Strangely, Japanese variants will also receive optional four-wheel-drive. Quite why you’d want such a feature on a supermini is beyond us but given that most Brits don’t care if their SUV possesses two driven axles, it’s unlikely Suzuki will give us the choice anyway.  

Official pricing for the new Swift is yet to be confirmed, however best estimates suggest a sub £20,000 starting figure to be realistic. At this level, the new Suzuki will join an increasingly sparce band of hyper-accessible runabouts – potentially allowing it to capitalise on an audience who can’t afford the leap to pricier EV alternatives like Corsa-e

With historic rivals such as Ford’s Fiesta now dead and buried, we can’t wait to see if the new Swift can offer a similar blend of practicality, affordability, and genuine driver involvement. Will this new Suzuki be on your radar when it arrives in 2024, or does the cheaper Dacia Sandero get your vote? 

Hero image credit:  Suzuki

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